10 Common Reasons Kids Should Say Thank You

It seems our society has become more casual than in the past, but good manners will never go out of style. This article may help you explain and teach your child the reasons and benefits of a simple “Thank You”. I hope you enjoy!

Jenell

Saying thank you is second nature to most people and we tend to take this simple expression of gratitude for granted. However, because it’s so common, a thank you left unsaid becomes a glaring omission. Parents who don’t teach their children to say thank you are doing a great disservice to their children. People think kids who don’t say thanks are just plain rude. Here are 10 common reasons you should teach your kids to say thank you.

  1. Manners – First of all, it’s just good manners to say thank you. Kids need to learn socially acceptable behavior early and have it reinforced throughout their childhood. Thank you should be two of the first words a child learns to say, after please of course.
  2. Respect – Saying thank you shows respect, especially to adults. Parents should teach their children that not showing gratitude is disrespectful and frowned upon by others.
  3. Show gratitude – Of course, a simple thanks shows gratitude and lets the giver know the gift is appreciated. Even the smallest gesture should be acknowledged when it’s given freely.
  4. Polite – Kids should learn how to be polite to others and saying thank you is part of that process. First you say please, then thank you, follow up with a your welcome and repeat often.
  5. Appreciated – People really appreciate it when kids say thank you and they notice when it’s omitted. When children are unable to express their appreciation for a gift in person, they should be encouraged to send thank you notes.
  6. Etiquette – Saying thank you is just part of proper etiquette that all parents should teach their children. They need to know what’s expected of them to get along in polite society and improper etiquette won’t get them very far.
  7. Good example – Kids who can give an unprompted thank you when it’s required are a good example to their peers and siblings. Politeness is contagious and should be generously shared as often as possible.
  8. Reflects well – When people observe children saying a polite thank you, it reflects well on their parents. On the other hand, when that simple gesture is omitted, it really reflects poorly. Most adults will wonder who’s raising this rude child.
  9. Shows maturity – Polite children appear much more mature than their rude peers and their more likely to gain respect from adults. Kids should be encouraged to say thank you by letting them know it’s the grown up thing to do.
  10. Good habits – Saying please and thank you are just good habits for kids to get into and it should become second nature to them. Repeated often enough, eventually they won’t need to be reminded.

When teaching your children to say please and thank you, be sure to lead by example. Kids learn best by imitation, so make a point of saying thank you to them as well. Since the words thank you can be difficult for toddlers who are just learning to talk, learning it in sign language first can be easier for them. It may become tedious to continually remind kids to say thank you, but eventually it will become second nature to them and they won’t need to be reminded. Giving your children a strong foundation in good manners will serve them well throughout their lives.

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Grocery Shopping With School-Age Kids

Oh boy, who hasn’t been witness to a grocery store meltdown??!! Here are some helpful tips to hopefully avoid a scene of your own, while teaching your children valuable skills in math, nutrition, and smart choices. Enjoy the article!
Jenell
School-age children learn important lessons in nutrition while grocery shopping.
By
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Grocery shopping with children in tow may be tough from time to time, but the jury’s in and experts agree: grocery shopping with kids fosters skills they need for life.

“The more often your kids shop with you, the better it is for their development,” says Tanya Remer Altmann, MD, a pediatrician. School-age children can sharpen a variety of skills in the supermarket, including those that will help them to make savvy food choices on their own in the years to come.

But what about the whining, begging, and boredom? There will always be some of that. The trick is to make kids part of the process, long before you head out to the store.

Grocery Shopping With Kids: It Starts With a Plan

Before setting foot into the store, you want to lay a little groundwork. One key is to get children involved in the grocery shopping process. Try:

  • Talking about what to buy for healthy meals and snacks, then have kids make a list of what you need, suggests Janice Bissex, MS, RD, co-author of The Moms’ Guide to Meal Makeovers.
  • Get everyone involved in checking store flyers for sales, or new and different healthy foods to try.
  • Keep kids involved emotionally. Allow them to pick a few items for school lunches and other meals.

Ready, Set, Grocery Shop!

Once you’re in the store, give your kids as much to do as they can handle for their age. Here are some ways to keep kids busy and hone their skills.

  • Let Kids Help. Dole out coupons to kids and let them find the relevant foods. Or delegate part of the grocery shopping list and have kids locate the items. They can also help by crossing off items as you toss them in the cart. And stick to the list as much as possible to curb costs and set a good example.
  • Make Up Some Math Games. School-age kids are capable of tracking grocery costs with a calculator. Have them enter the price of each item. It’s fun for them to see how close they come to the final cost. In the produce section, try:
  • Asking kids about how much six apples might weigh, then weigh the fruit to see if they were close.
  • Ask kids to place 2 pounds worth of oranges in a bag for you.
  • Give older boys and girls the price per pound, and have them guess at the total price. See how close they come at checkout.

Play “I Spy.” When grocery shopping with older kids have them play detective, searching out certain items for you, such as:

  • Cereal with at least 4 grams of fiber and fewer than 8 grams of sugar per serving
  • Pineapple canned in its own juice

Article Source – http://www.webmd.com/diet/guide/shopping-children